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Just War Theory

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Iterating Badness in the Paradox of Deontology

 

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In 'Must Consequentialists Kill?' (forthcoming in J Phil), Setiya convincingly argues against the "orthodox" view that commonsense verdicts about the ethics of killing entail agent-relativity.  Instead, he observes: "In general, when you should not cause harm to one in a way that will benefit others, you should not want others to do so either." (p.8 on pre-print version)  For example, it's not just the agent that should prefer to avoid themselves killing one to prevent five killings, but we should generally prefer that others likewise avoid killing one to prevent five other killings.  The preference here mandated by commonsense morality is thus agent-neutral in nature: it makes no essential reference to your role in the situation.This seems right (I mean, correct as a claim about "commonsense morality", not actually right...), and it avoids one horn of the paradox of deontology, namely worries about how the reasons to act morally, if merely. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera

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Elizabeth Bishop had astonishing control and poetic technique. But below the surface was a gushing emotional register. Was she the loneliest person who ever lived?

 

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Elizabeth Bishop had astonishing control and poetic technique. But below the surface was a gushing emotional register. Was she the loneliest person who ever lived?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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Unequivocal Justice

 

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2017.10.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christopher Freiman, Unequivocal Justice, Routledge, 2017, 157 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138628229. Reviewed by Andrew I. Cohen, Georgia State University John Rawls famously defends two principles of justice as those to which free and equal persons would agree. These principles apply to the basic structure of society. The basic structure includes the norms and institutions determining fundamental "rights, liberties, and opportunities" that any person needs, regardless of her particular aims.[1] In his engaging and provocative book, Christopher Freiman argues that Rawlsians often wrongly dismiss free market systems as vehicles for realizing justice. Rawlsians are guilty of a "self-obviating idealization" (11): they assume an injustice makes robust redistributive states necessary, but ignore how that injustice perverts state institutions. Though Freiman might not convince many Rawlsians, he poses an. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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William James

 

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[Revised entry by Russell Goodman on October 20, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] William James was an original thinker in and between the disciplines of physiology, psychology and philosophy. His twelve-hundred page masterwork, The Principles of Psychology (1890), is a rich blend of physiology, psychology, philosophy, and personal reflection that has given us such ideas as "the stream of thought" and the baby's impression of the world "as one great blooming, buzzing confusion" (PP 462). It contains seeds of pragmatism and...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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"The fate of artists and of art itself is in the hands of too few persons, who share kindred tastes and cultish dogma," says Jonathan Meades. It is a cult of "puritanical, po-faced, censorious nothingness"

 

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"The fate of artists and of art itself is in the hands of too few persons, who share kindred tastes and cultish dogma," says Jonathan Meades. It is a cult of "puritanical, po-faced, censorious nothingness"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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Justice and Access to Health Care

 

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[Revised entry by Norman Daniels on October 20, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Many societies, and nearly all wealthy, developed countries, provide universal access to a broad range of public health and personal medical services. Is such access to health care a requirement of social justice, or is it simply a matter of social policy that some countries adopt and others do not? If it is a requirement of social justice, we should be clear about what kinds of care we owe people and how we determine what care is owed if we cannot possibly meet every health need, as arguably no society can. We should be clear about what...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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O Niebuhr, Where Art Thou?” He died along with the literate public's interest in theology. Now Christian thought is in a long retreat. It doesn’t have to be that way

 

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“O Niebuhr, Where Art Thou?” He died along with the literate public's interest in theology. Now Christian thought is in a long retreat. It doesn’t have to be that way

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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Lecturer in Philosophy (Ethics and Critical Thinking)

 

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Job List: 
Asia/Africa/Australasia
Name of institution: 
University of Sydney
Town: 
Sydney
Country: 
Australia . . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

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Lecturer in Philosophy (Epistemology, Metaphysics and Logic)

 

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Job List: 
Asia/Africa/Australasia
Name of institution: 
The University of Sydney
Town: 
Sydney
Country: 
Australia . . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

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Zeno's Paradoxes

 

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[Revised entry by Nick Huggett on October 20, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Almost everything that we know about Zeno of Elea is to be found in the opening pages of Plato's Parmenides. There we learn that Zeno was nearly 40 years old when Socrates was a young man, say 20. Since Socrates was born in 469 BC we can estimate a birth date for Zeno around 490 BC. Beyond this, really all we know is that he was close to Parmenides (Plato reports the gossip that they were lovers when Zeno was young), and that he wrote a book of paradoxes defending Parmenides' philosophy. Sadly this book has not survived, and...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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